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Excess sugar may play role in diabetes, obesity, high BP

Washington , Tue, 23 Nov 2010 ANI

Washington, Nov 23 (ANI): Excessive amounts of fructose, present in added sugars, may play a role in high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, and chronic kidney disease - according to a new study.

 

Richard J. Johnson and Takahiko Nakagawa at University of Colorado found that dietary fructose, present primarily in added dietary sugars, honey, and fruit, can be dangerous to health if taken in excess.

 

The link between excessive intake of fructose and metabolic syndrome is becoming increasingly established. The authors conclude that there is also increasing evidence that fructose may play a role in hypertension and renal disease.

 

"Science shows us there is a potentially negative impact of excessive amounts of sugar and high fructose corn syrup on cardiovascular and kidney health," said Johnson.

 

He continued. "Excessive fructose intake could be viewed as an increasingly risky food and beverage additive."

 

Johnson and Nakagawa recommend that low protein diets include an attempt to restrict added sugars containing fructose. They added that physicians should not overlook this health problem when advising CKD patients to follow a low protein diet.

 

The study appears in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. (ANI)

 


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